Derivation of seawater <i>p</i>CO<sub>2</sub> from net community production identifies the South Atlantic Ocean as a CO<sub>2</sub> source

Ford, DJ; Tilstone, GH; Shutler, JD; Kitidis, V. 2022 Derivation of seawater <i>p</i>CO<sub>2</sub> from net community production identifies the South Atlantic Ocean as a CO<sub>2</sub> source. Biogeosciences, 19 (1). 93-115. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-93-2022

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-19-93-2022

Abstract/Summary

A key step in assessing the global carbon budget is the determination of the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater (pCO2 (sw)). Spatially complete observational fields of pCO2 (sw) are routinely produced for regional and global ocean carbon budget assessments by extrapolating sparse in situ measurements of pCO2 (sw) using satellite observations. As part of this process, satellite chlorophyll a (Chl a) is often used as a proxy for the biological drawdown or release of CO2. Chl a does not, however, quantify carbon fixed through photosynthesis and then respired, which is determined by net community production (NCP). In this study, pCO2 (sw) over the South Atlantic Ocean is estimated using a feed forward neural network (FNN) scheme and either satellite-derived NCP, net primary production (NPP) or Chl a to compare which biological proxy produces the most accurate fields of pCO2 (sw) . Estimates of pCO2 (sw) using NCP, NPP or Chl a were similar, but NCP was more accurate for the Amazon Plume and upwelling regions, which were not fully reproduced when using Chl a or NPP. A perturbation analysis assessed the potential maximum reduction in pCO2 (sw) uncertainties that could be achieved by reducing the uncertainties in the satellite biological parameters. This illustrated further improvement using NCP compared to NPP or Chl a. Using NCP to estimate pCO2 (sw) showed that the South Atlantic Ocean is a CO2 source, whereas if no biological parameters are used in the FNN (following existing annual carbon assessments), this region appears to be a sink for CO2. These results highlight that using NCP improved the accuracy of estimating pCO2 (sw) and changes the South Atlantic Ocean from a CO2 sink to a source. Reducing the uncertainties in NCP derived from satellite parameters will ultimately improve our understanding and confidence in quantification of the global ocean as a CO2 sink.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Divisions: Plymouth Marine Laboratory > National Capability categories > Atlantic Meridional Transect
Depositing User: S Hawkins
Date made live: 13 Jan 2022 11:03
Last Modified: 13 Jan 2022 11:03
URI: https://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/9527

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