Ecological performance differs between range centre and trailing edge populations of a cold-water kelp: implications for estimating net primary productivity

King, NG; Moore, PJ; Pessarrodona, A; Burrows, MT; Porter, J; Bue, M; Smale, DA. 2020 Ecological performance differs between range centre and trailing edge populations of a cold-water kelp: implications for estimating net primary productivity. Marine Biology, 167, 137. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-020-03743-5

[img]
Preview
Text
62 Ecological performance differs between range centre and trailing edge populations of a cold-water kelp - implications for estimating net primary production.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (2MB) | Preview
Official URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-0...

Abstract/Summary

Kelp forests are extensive, widely distributed and highly productive. However, despite their importance, reliable estimates of net primary productivity (NPP) are currently unknown for most species and regions. In particular, how performance and subsequent NPP change throughout a species range is lacking. Here, we attempted to resolve this by examining growth and performance of the boreal kelp, Laminaria digitata, from range centre and trailing edge regions in the United Kingdom. During the peak growth season (March/April), range-centre individuals were up to three times heavier and accumulated biomass twice as fast as their trailing-edge counterparts. This was not apparent during the reduced growth season (August/September), when populations within both regions had similar biomass profiles. In total, annual NPP estimates were considerably lower for trailing-edge (181±34 g C m−2 year−1) compared to range-centre (344±33 g C m−2 year−1) populations. Our first-order UK estimates of total standing stock and NPP for L. digitata suggest this species makes a significant contribution to coastal carbon cycling. Further work determining the ultimate fate of this organic matter is needed to understand the overall contribution of kelp populations to regional and global carbon cycles. Nevertheless, we highlight the need for large-scale sampling across multiple populations and latitudes to accurately evaluate kelp species’ contributions to coastal carbon cycling.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Subjects: Marine Sciences
Divisions: Marine Biological Association of the UK > Ecosystems and Environmental Change > Global environmental change and marine ecosystems
Depositing User: Emily Smart
Date made live: 03 Sep 2021 10:43
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2021 10:43
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/9343

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item