Lipid production through the single-step microwave hydrolysis of macroalgae using the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima

Abeln, F; Fan, J; Budarin, VL; Briers, H; Parsons, S; Allen, MJ; Henk, DA; Clark, J; Chuck, CJ. 2019 Lipid production through the single-step microwave hydrolysis of macroalgae using the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Algal Research, 38. 101411. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.algal.2019.101411

[img] Text
Final draft.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 March 2020.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB)
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.algal.2019.101411

Abstract/Summary

Macroalgae (seaweeds) represent an emerging resource for food and the production of commodity and specialty chemicals. In this study, a single-step microwave process was used to depolymerise a range of macroalgae native to the United Kingdom, producing a growth medium suitable for microbial fermentation. The medium contained a range of mono- and polysaccharides as well as macro- and micronutrients that could be metabolised by the oleaginous yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Among twelve macroalgae species, the brown seaweeds exhibited the highest fermentation potential, especially the kelp Saccharina latissima. Applying a portfolio of ten native M. pulcherrima strains, yeast growth kinetics, as well as production of lipids and 2-phenylethanol were examined, with productivity and growth rate being strain dependent. On the 2 L scale, 6.9 g L−1 yeast biomass – a yield of 0.14 g g−1 with respect to the supplied macroalgae – containing 37.2% (w/w) lipid was achieved through utilisation of the proteins, mono- and polysaccharides from S. latissima, with no additional enzymes. In addition, the yeast degraded a range of fermentation inhibitors released upon microwave processing at high temperatures and long holding times. As macroalgae can be cultured to food grade, this system offers a novel, potentially low-cost route to edible microbial oils as well as a renewable feedstock for oleochemicals.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Divisions: Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Other (PML)
Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Science Areas > Marine Biochemistry and Observations
Depositing User: Kim Hockley
Date made live: 12 Mar 2019 15:00
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2019 15:00
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/8163

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item