Modeling of extreme freshwater outflow from the north-eastern Japanese river basins to western Pacific Ocean

Troselj, J; Sayama, T; Varlamov, SM; Sasaki, T; Racault, M-FLP; Takara, K; Miyazawa, Y; Kuroki, R; Yamagata, T; Yamashiki, Y. 2017 Modeling of extreme freshwater outflow from the north-eastern Japanese river basins to western Pacific Ocean. Journal of Hydrology, 555. 956-970. 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.10.042

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.10.042

Abstract/Summary

This study demonstrates the importance of accurate extreme discharge input in hydrological and oceanographic combined modeling by introducing two extreme typhoon events. We investigated the effects of extreme freshwater outflow events from river mouths on sea surface salinity distribution (SSS) in the coastal zone of the north-eastern Japan. Previous studies have used observed discharge at the river mouth, as well as seasonally averaged inter-annual, annual, monthly or daily simulated data. Here, we reproduced the hourly peak discharge during two typhoon events for a targeted set of nine rivers and compared their impact on SSS in the coastal zone based on observed, climatological and simulated freshwater outflows in conjunction with verification of the results using satellite remote-sensing data. We created a set of hourly simulated freshwater outflow data from nine first-class Japanese river basins flowing to the western Pacific Ocean for the two targeted typhoon events (Chataan and Roke) and used it with the integrated hydrological (CDRMV3.1.1) and oceanographic (JCOPE-T) model, to compare the case using climatological mean monthly discharges as freshwater input from rivers with the case using our hydrological model simulated discharges. By using the CDRMV model optimized with the SCE-UA method, we successfully reproduced hindcasts for peak discharges of extreme typhoon events at the river mouths and could consider multiple river basin locations. Modeled SSS results were verified by comparison with Chlorophyll-a distribution, observed by satellite remote sensing. The projection of SSS in the coastal zone became more realistic than without including extreme freshwater outflow. These results suggest that our hydrological models with optimized model parameters calibrated to the Typhoon Roke and Chataan cases can be successfully used to predict runoff values from other extreme precipitation events with similar physical characteristics. Proper simulation of extreme typhoon events provides more realistic coastal SSS and may allow a different scenario analysis with various precipitation inputs for developing a nowcasting analysis in the future.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Additional Keywords: Sea surface salinity, Extreme typhoon events, Coastal zone, Integrated hydrological and oceanographic model, Nowcasting, ocean colour remote sensing, climate
Subjects: Earth Observation - Remote Sensing
Meteorology and Climatology
Oceanography
Divisions: Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Science Areas > Earth Observation Science and Applications
Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Science Areas > Sea from Space
Depositing User: Marie-Fanny Racault
Date made live: 01 Dec 2017 15:33
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2017 15:33
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/7616

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