Repeated rapid assessment surveys reveal contrasting trends in occupancy of marinas by non-indigenous species on opposite sides of the western English Channel

Bishop, JDD; Wood, CA; Lévêque, L; Yunnie, ALE; Viard, F. 2015 Repeated rapid assessment surveys reveal contrasting trends in occupancy of marinas by non-indigenous species on opposite sides of the western English Channel [in special issue: The English Channel and it’s catchments: Status and Responses to Contaminants] Marine Pollution Bulletin, 95 (2). 699-706. 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.11.043

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.11.043

Abstract/Summary

Highlights • A cluster of non-native sessile invertebrates has recently colonised Channel coasts. •Their site occupancy suggests earlier establishment in France than in England. • Recent cross-Channel spreading was thus probably mostly from France to England. • Some recent arrivals suggest an ongoing influence of importation of Pacific oysters. • Different species show widely divergent rates of spread between marinas. Abstract Rapid assessment surveys of non-indigenous species (NIS) of sessile invertebrates were made at seven marinas in NW France and 10 marinas in SW England in 2010, and repeated in 2013. Fourteen NIS were recorded, 12 of which were seen on both coasts. Site occupancy differed between the opposite sides of the western English Channel. In Brittany, most species occurred at most sites in both 2010 and 2013. In 2010, site occupancy in Devon & Cornwall was distinctly lower; by 2013, the difference compared to Brittany had narrowed considerably, largely because of rapid colonisation of additional sites by species that were infrequent in 2010. Three more of the recent NIS are present in Devon & Cornwall but have still not become widespread. It is concluded that the recently introduced fouling animals studied here are longer established in NW France than in SW England, and have probably spread northwards across the Channel.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Subjects: Conservation
Ecology and Environment
Marine Sciences
Zoology
Divisions: Marine Biological Association of the UK > Ecosystems and Environmental Change > Biology & invasion ecology of sessile marine animals
Depositing User: John Bishop
Date made live: 16 Jan 2017 14:47
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 16:16
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/7143

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