Chemistry and Release of Gases from the Surface Ocean

Carpenter, LJ; Nightingale, PD. 2015 Chemistry and Release of Gases from the Surface Ocean [in special issue: 2015 Chemistry in Climate] Chemical Reviews, 115 (10). 4015-4034. 10.1021/cr5007123

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr5007123

Abstract/Summary

The sea-surface layer is the very upper part of the sea surface where reduced mixing leads to strong gradients in physical, chemical and biological properties1. This surface layer is naturally reactive, containing a complex chemistry of inorganic components and dissolved organic matter (DOM), the latter including amino acids, proteins, fatty acids, carbohydrates, and humic-type components,2 with a high proportion of functional groups such as carbonyls, carboxylic acids and aromatic moieties.3 The different physical and chemical properties of the surface of the ocean compared with bulk seawater, and its function as a gateway for molecules to enter the atmosphere or ocean phase, make this an interesting and important region for study. A number of chemical reactions are believed to occur on and in the surface ocean; these may be important or even dominant sources or sinks of climatically-active marine trace gases. However the sea surface, especially the top 1um to 1mm known as the sea surface microlayer (ssm), is critically under-sampled, so to date much of the evidence for such chemistry comes from laboratory and/or modeling studies. This review discusses the chemical and physical structure of the sea surface, mechanisms for gas transfer across it, and explains the current understanding of trace gas formation at this critical interface between the ocean and atmosphere.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Additional Keywords: KeyWords Plus:DISSOLVED ORGANIC-MATTER; MARINE BOUNDARY-LAYER; AIR-SEA INTERFACE; CARBON-MONOXIDE PHOTOPRODUCTION; PHOTOCHEMICAL PRODUCTION; NATURAL-WATERS; AQUEOUS-SOLUTION; HUMIC SUBSTANCES; ATLANTIC-OCEAN; NORTH-ATLANTIC
Subjects: Atmospheric Sciences
Chemistry
Oceanography
Divisions: Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Science Areas > Marine Biochemistry and Observations
Depositing User: Professor Philip Nightingale
Date made live: 10 Aug 2015 15:13
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 16:13
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/6392

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