Effects of formalin preservation on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures in Calanoid copepods: implications for the use of Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey samples in stable isotope analyses

Bicknell, AWJ; Campbell, M; Knight, ME; Bilton, DT; Newton, J; Votier, SC. 2011 Effects of formalin preservation on stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures in Calanoid copepods: implications for the use of Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey samples in stable isotope analyses. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 25 (13). 1794–1800.

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Abstract/Summary

Preserved and archived organic material offers huge potential for the conduct of retrospective and long-term historical ecosystem reconstructions using stable isotope analyses, but because of isotopic exchange with preservatives the obtained values require validation. The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey is the most extensive long-term monitoring program for plankton communities worldwide and has utilised ships of opportunity to collect samples since 1931. To keep the samples intact for subsequent analysis, they are collected and preserved in formalin; however, previous studies have found that this may alter stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in zooplankton. A maximum ~0.9‰ increase of δ15N and a time dependent maximum ~1.0‰ decrease of δ13C were observed when the copepod, Calanus helgolandicus, was experimentally exposed to two formalin preservatives for 12 months. Applying specific correction factors to δ15N and δ13C values for similarly preserved Calanoid species collected by the CPR Survey within 12 months of analysis may be appropriate to enable their use in stable isotope studies. The isotope values of samples stored frozen did not differ significantly from those of controls. Although the impact of formalin preservation was relatively small in this and other studies of marine zooplankton, changes in isotope signatures are not consistent across taxa, especially for δ15N, indicating that species-specific studies may be required. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Divisions: Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science
Depositing User: Miss Gemma Brice
Date made live: 26 Mar 2014 14:09
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 16:10
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/5678

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