The Influence Of Temperature And Salinity On Energy Partitioning In The Marine Nematode Diplolaimelloides-Bruciei

Warwick, RM. 1981 The Influence Of Temperature And Salinity On Energy Partitioning In The Marine Nematode Diplolaimelloides-Bruciei. Oecologia, 51 (3). 318 - 325. 10.1007/BF00540900

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00540900

Abstract/Summary

Measurements of population growth, generation time, fecundity and respiration in laboratory culture have been made, in relation to temperature and salinity, for the nematode Diplolaimelloides bruciei Hopper, a species normally associated with decayed material of the marsh grass Spartina. The intrinsic rate of increase (r) is high: it is related to temperature between 5° and 25°C by a sigmoid function which is steepest between 10° and 15°C, and is maximum at 26‰ salinity. Generation time is related to temperature by a power function and is shortest at 26‰ salinity. The effect of temperature on generation time is consistent with other data for marine nematodes, and the steep slope of r against temperature is largely due to the marked effect of temperature on fecundity. A sex ratio of 2:1 in favour of males is maintained regardless of culture conditions or population density. Respiration increases exponentially with temperature between 5° and 25°C, with a very high Q10 (3.94), but is not affected by salinity. At 30°C respiration is no higher than at 25°C. A high and relatively stable production efficiency (P/A) is maintained between 10 and 30°C with a maximum of 87% at 15°C; there is a stable reproductive effort (Pr/A) of about 10%. At 5°C both these ratios are zero. Data for the harpacticoid copepod Tachidius discipes, derived from the literature, show that this too has a high and stable production efficiency, which may be a characteristic of meiofaunal species in general, but in this species efficiency is relatively high at 5°C. Many features of the energy balance in D. bruciei can be related to an opportunistic mode of life.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Divisions: Plymouth Marine Laboratory > Other (PML)
Depositing User: EPServices Admin
Date made live: 11 Feb 2014 15:54
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 16:03
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/2775

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