An individual-based model of the early life history of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) in the eastern North Atlantic, simulating transport, growth and mortality

Bartsch, J; Coombs, SH. 2004 An individual-based model of the early life history of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) in the eastern North Atlantic, simulating transport, growth and mortality. Fisheries Oceanography, 13 (6). 365-379. 10.1111/j.1365-2419.2004.00305.x

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Abstract/Summary

The main purpose of this paper is to provide the core description of the modelling exercise within the Shelf Edge Advection Mortality And Recruitment (SEAMAR) programme. An individual-based model (IBM) was developed for the prediction of year-to-year survival of the early life-history stages of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) in the eastern North Atlantic. The IBM is one of two components of the model system. The first component is a circulation model to provide physical input data for the IBM. The circulation model is a geographical variant of the HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM). The second component is the IBM, which is an i-space configuration model in which large numbers of individuals are followed as discrete entities to simulate the transport, growth and mortality of mackerel eggs, larvae and post-larvae. Larval and post-larval growth is modelled as a function of length, temperature and food distribution; mortality is modelled as a function of length and absolute growth rate. Each particle is considered as a super-individual representing 10 super(6) eggs at the outset of the simulation, and then declining according to the mortality function. Simulations were carried out for the years 1998-2000. Results showed concentrations of particles at Porcupine Bank and the adjacent Irish shelf, along the Celtic Sea shelf-edge, and in the southern Bay of Biscay. High survival was observed only at Porcupine and the adjacent shelf areas, and, more patchily, around the coastal margin of Biscay. The low survival along the shelf-edge of the Celtic Sea was due to the consistently low estimates of food availability in that area.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: The definitive (published) version of this paper is available at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com
Additional Keywords: Mortality causes Ocean circulation Marine fish Life history Recruitment Fishery oceanography Food availability Biological drift
Subjects: ?? SH ??
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Divisions: Marine Biological Association of the UK > Other (MBA)
Depositing User: EPServices Admin
Date made live: 29 Jun 2006
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 15:57
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/1478

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