Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change

Brander, K; Dickson, RR; Edwards, M. 2003 Use of Continuous Plankton Recorder information in support of marine management: applications in fisheries, environmental protection, and in the study of ecosystem response to environmental change. Progress in Oceanography, 58 (2-4). 175-191. 10.1016/j.pocean.2003.08.003

[img] PDF
brander_dickson_edwards.pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (392kB)
Official URL: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pocean

Abstract/Summary

The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey was conceived from the outset as a programme of applied research designed to assist the fishing industry. Its survival and continuing vigour after 70 years is a testament to its utility, which has been achieved in spite of great changes in our understanding of the marine environment and in our concerns over how to manage it. The CPR has been superseded in several respects by other technologies, such as acoustics and remote sensing, but it continues to provide unrivalled seasonal and geographic information about a wide range of zooplankton and phytoplankton taxa. The value of this coverage increases with time and provides the basis for placing recent observations into the context of long-term, large-scale variability and thus suggesting what the causes are likely to be. Information from the CPR is used extensively in judging environmental impacts and producing quality status reports (QSR); it has shown the distributions of fish stocks, which had not previously been exploited; it has pointed to the extent of ungrazed phytoplankton production in the North Atlantic, which was a vital element in establishing the importance of carbon sequestration by phytoplankton. The CPR continues to be the principal source of large-scale, long-term information about the plankton ecosystem of the North Atlantic. It has recently provided extensive information about the biodiversity of the plankton and about the distribution of introduced species. It serves as a valuable example for the design of future monitoring of the marine environment and it has been essential to the design and implementation of most North Atlantic plankton research.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Additional Keywords: Plankton collecting devices Climatic changes Plankton surveys Remote sensing Eutrophication
Subjects: ?? SH ??
Ecology and Environment
Divisions: Sir Alister Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science > Other (SAHFOS)
Depositing User: EPServices Admin
Date made live: 07 Aug 2006
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2017 15:56
URI: http://plymsea.ac.uk/id/eprint/1326

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item